War Book

war_bookIf you’re a regular here you should be aware of the legend that is (birthday boy) Ryan Fleming. As well as being a key member of Moody’s Survivors, he’s also a film director (WELCOME TO ESSEX), an intrepid reporter and zombie-experience survivor, and was a featured corpse in AUTUMN: AFTERMATH.

Ryan’s also an avid collector and watcher of post-apocalyptic movies and has given me plenty of great suggestions over the years. He mentioned another movie recently – WAR BOOK – and I’m really pleased he did. It’s a gripping BBC movie which is small in focus (it takes place largely in one room with a cast of ten), but large in scope.

It was recently shown on the BBC – UK viewers, you can still catch the film on iPlayer until around 6 September.

The premise is deceptively simple: a group of civil servants are shut in a room to practice their response and decisions to a rapidly escalating international crisis, triggered when Mumbai is hit with a nuclear weapon.

Here’s the trailer. Click the link for my thoughts.

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Massive Halloween event announcement

waterstones1I’m very, very, VERY excited to announce that Infected Books will be taking over the huge High Street Birmingham branch of Waterstones this Halloween (actually Halloween eve, but it’s close enough). You are cordially invited to join Wayne Simmons, myself, and other Infected Books alumni as we launch new books (Wayne and Andre Duza‘s VOODOO CHILD), read from new, as yet unannounced books, and maybe even reveal why 2016 is shaping up to be the year of Infected Books.

This is going to be an absolutely brilliant evening, so put it in your diaries and please do come along if you can (Halloween-themed fancy dress optional but strongly encouraged). Keep an eye on the Waterstones event page here. Things kick off at 7:00pm on Friday 30 October.

Wayne and I will also be appearing at the Bristol Horror Con at the Future Inn, Bristol a couple of weeks earlier on 17 October. Filling the space vacated by Wayne’s short-lived but already much-missed SCARDiff, it’s another one I’m really looking forward to. More details can be found here.

Arm N Toof’s Dead Time Podcast

I was absolutely honoured to be interviewed by best-selling authors ARMAND ROSAMILIA and MARK TUFO recently for their ARM N TOOF’S DEAD TIME PODCAST. I had a great time talking to Armand and Mark, and you can listen to the interview now on the podcast. Click the player below.

And do yourself a favour while you’re at it… subscribe to the show because it’s excellent: iTunes / Android / RSS

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Story Behind the Book

51nx7vZHruLBack in November 2013 I was asked to contribute an article about the genesis of the AUTUMN series to the fine folk at upcoming4.me, a great literary site. You can read the piece I wrote at this link.

I’m pleased to advise that my article has been collected alongside numerous others and released in print form as part of THE STORY BEHIND THE BOOK VOLUME 5 which is available now. It contains essays from a large number of writers, some of whom will no doubt be familiar to you… Sarah Pinborough, Paul Kane, Stephen Volk, Charlaine Harris, and Gareth L Powell to name but five. The collection is available from Amazon.co.uk and Amazon.com.

In case you were wondering (because I’m sure you were), the front cover shows a computer manipulated image of pFAK protein in RPMI-7951, taken by Ivana, one of the book’s editors.

And if you’re interested in a little more behind-the-scenes AUTUMN, check out this link to the retrospective pieces I wrote about each book in the series a few years ago.

Das Mädchen im Keller: Psychothriller

dasmaedchenimkeller-223x335I’m very pleased to announce the first fruits of the Infected Books and Voodoo Press partnership… THE GIRL IN THE BASEMENTWayne Simmons‘ nasty little bestselling tale, is now available in German. German readers, pick up a copy of Das Mädchen im Keller: Psychothriller from iBooks or Amazon.

And there will be more Infected Books titles getting the Voodoo Press treatment in the near future. Next up is my own anti-science fiction novel, TRUST.

Night of the Living Dead (1990)

NIGHT-OF-THE-LIVING-DEAD-1990-posterA couple of times recently I’ve talked about remakes of classic horror movies. Sometimes they work, and sometimes they don’t. I maintain that in order for a remake to be a critical success, it has to have a point. It might be that the original fell short in some way, or that film-making technology has advanced sufficiently to benefit the telling of a particular story. Or maybe a sociological, environmental or political change or similar has given the premise a new lease of life.

Unfortunately, the George Romero scripted, Tom Savini directed 1990 remake of Romero’s classic NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD has very little reason to exist. I caught the remake on it’s opening weekend twenty-five years ago (twenty-five years… how did that happen?) and I took the opportunity to watch it again recently. I really enjoyed it when I was twenty, and I wondered how it would hold up today. The short answer – it didn’t. Not particularly well, anyway.

It’s a new night for terror – and a new dawn in horror movie-making when special-effects genius Tom Savini (creator of the spectacularly gruesome make-up in FRIDAY THE 13TH and CREEPSHOW) brings modern technology to this colourful remake of George A. Romero‘s 1968 cult classic. Seven strangers are trapped in an isolated farmhouse while cannibalistic zombies – awakened from death by the return of a radioactive space probe – wage a relentless attack, killing (and eating) everyone in their path. The classic for the 90s: graphic, gruesome and more terrifying than ever!

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Another sighting – HATER news imminent

I was in #Greece this weekend and spotted this. Have the Greeks already heard the #Hater news? I'll be sharing very soon. The ink's dry. The first announcement is imminent

I was in Greece this weekend and spotted this scrawled on a wall. Does this mean the long-teased HATER news is imminent?

Yes it is. The deal is signed and the ink is dry. An official announcement will be made here next week (I hope) and who knows – there may even be a second piece of HATER news to follow.

Thanks for your patience. More very soon. Things are about to get exciting.

An American Werewolf in London (and my regular Scream Magazine plug)

olly-mossawilThere are some films you can watch over and over and never get bored of. They’re timeless classics – as close to perfection as you can get. They’re the kind of films that make you recoil in terror whenever anyone dares mention remakes, because there’s absolutely no point. AN AMERICAN WEREWOLF IN LONDON is one of those films.

I’m taking the opportunity to write about it now because a). it’s one of my absolute favourite movies and b). it’s heavily featured in the latest edition of SCREAM magazine. I’m sure you’ve already seen it (if not, why not?), but here’s a quick summary courtesy of IMDB and a trailer (which was produced for the bluray release a few years back, and which completely fails to capture the atmosphere of this most atmospheric film). Click the link below for my thoughts.

(By the way, check out the stunning Olly Moss poster I found online. It’s a thing of beauty.)

Two American college students are on a walking tour of Britain and are attacked by a werewolf. One is killed, the other is mauled. The werewolf is killed but reverts to its human form, and the local townspeople are unwilling to acknowledge its existence. The surviving student begins to have nightmares of hunting on four feet at first but then finds that his friend and other recent victims appear to him, demanding that he commit suicide to release them from their curse, being trapped between worlds because of their unnatural deaths.

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The Mammoth Book of Sherlock Holmes Abroad – out in the US tomorrow

91PFJaRHh8LThe title of this post says it all really. This anthology, edited by the great Simon Clark, hits the shelves in the US tomorrow. Published by Running Press, it’s available from all the usual outlets including Amazon, IndieBound and Barnes and Noble. Publishers Weekly gave the collection an excellent starred review which you can read below. Click here to remind yourself of the contents and contributors.

Clark (The Night of the Triffids) has done a superior job in selecting the 15 original pastiches for this anthology, all of which remove Holmes from his Baker Street haunts to exercise his deduction skills in less familiar terrain. The standout, Paul Finch’s “The Monster of Hell’s Gate,” sends Holmes and Watson to East Africa, where the legendary Nandi bear, a creature familiar to cryptozoologists, has been decimating native workers on a new rail line. Finch blends suspense, atmosphere, and fair-play cluing so skillfully that many would welcome a longer Holmes story from his imagination. The always-reliable Denis O. Smith takes the duo to Russia in “The Adventure of the Colonel’s Daughter,” to clear a man caught literally red-handed at the scene of a murder. Clark’s own “The Climbing Man” confronts Holmes with an impossible crime in Mesopotamia. The consistent excellence makes this a better choice for Sherlockians than such similar volumes as “Sherlock Holmes in America” and “Sherlock Holmes: The American Years.”