Cover reveal – German edition of TRUST

The first releases as part of the Voodoo Press partnership with Infected Books will soon be hitting the shelves. Today I’m very excited to be able to share with you the cover art for the German language edition of TRUST, due out later in 2015. More news coming soon. You can learn more about TRUST by visiting www.trustdavidmoody.com.

Trust DE

The German language Kindle edition is already available to pre-order here.

SCREAM issue 30

11251912_1138578559501470_5951843107686018385_nThis month’s SCREAM MAGAZINE had me sold before I’d even got past the front cover with the promise of interviews with Angus Scrimm (the Tall Man from Don Coscarelli‘s magnificently bonkers PHANTASM movies) and Joe Alves, the man who designed Spielberg’s JAWS. Add to that the first part of a feature on lost 21 century horror movies, a look back at the Hammer classic THE DEVIL RIDES OUT, an interview with Sid Haig and loads more, and you’ve got yourself another cracking issue of my favourite horror mag. I’ve said it many times before and I’ll say it again now – I make no apologies for promoting SCREAM every time a new issue hits the shelves. This is the kind of magazine which fed my adolescent horror addiction in those dark pre-Internet, pre-DVD days. Long may it continue!

Visit www.screamhorrormag.com, or pick up the magazine from any branch of HMV, Forbidden Planet, or any of the newsagents listed hereSCREAM is also available digitally as iSCREAM!

The Understated Subtlety of Mad Max: Fury Road

Absolutely no irony whatsoever is intended in the title of this post.

MAD MAX and I go a long way back. My interest was piqued when the first film came out in the late 1970s. The UK was a dull and repressed place in many ways back then and, as a nine year old, I remember hearing a respected film critic (Leslie Halliwell, I think) say that Mad Max was so violent it would never be shown on TV, and that, of course, just made me even more desperate to watch it. How times have changed. What would Mr Halliwell think had he still been alive today to see the newest Mad Max movie becoming such an incredible, and largely unexpected, cultural goliath?

Mad Max was a great movie. MAD MAX 2 – THE ROAD WARRIOR – was something else entirely. As a Cold War Kid, I think it had a lot to do with the apocalyptic setting of the second film, and the fact we were watching a character we’d grown to know in the ‘normal’ world, having to deal with the nightmare of a post World War III (we presumed) existence. That’s something that’s always appealed to me. It’s one of the reasons THREADS remains so chilling today – we grow attached to characters in the relative normality of their day-to-day existence, then follow the hell they endure when their lives are, quite literally, blown apart. Road Warrior set new standards and paved the way for a thousand pale imitations.

I even enjoyed MAD MAX: BEYOND THUNDERDOME, though the years have been less kind to the audience-friendly third movie in the series and unlike the timelessness of the other films, it feels rooted in the 1980s (thanks in no small part to Tina Turner and her ubiquitous title song).

Back to the point of today’s post: MAD MAX: FURY ROAD. Sure it’s an incredible spectacle: a non-stop, adrenalin-fuelled, action rush of movie. But it’s also so, so much more than that.

Continue reading

Next Event – Cardiff Independent Comic Expo 27 June 2015

It’s great to be able to confirm that Wayne Simmons and I will be flying the Infected Books flag at the Cardiff Independent Comic Expo next month. Kicking off at 10:00am at the Cardiff Masonic Hall, Guildford Street, the event is designed to showcase the very best in indie comics from South Wales and beyond (with a couple of dodgy-looking horror authors thrown into the mix). Guests include: Jasper Bark, Jason Cardy, Mike Collins, Ian Edginton, Patrick Goddard, Paul Grist, Anthony D Lee, Dylan Teague, Rob Williams, Simon Williams and many, many more. Tickets cost just £5 and are available from the Expo’s website. More information about the event is available on Facebook, and follow the team on Twitter to keep up to date with the latest updates. Hope to see you there!

sh_postcard_cice

Did you get to meet the STRANGERS?

My most recent novel, STRANGERS, came out at the end of 2014, and with everything that’s been going on since then, I’ve been guilty of not shouting about it enough. The book got some great press and I’m very proud of it. This is Horror were kind enough to say “Strangers is easily Moody’s best work to date, a dark, disturbing and visceral book that gives him a legitimate claim to the title of Britain’s Best Living Horror Author that was left vacant by James Herbert’s untimely death.DLS reviews said “I can’t stress enough how utterly captivating Strangers is. It’s addictive reading from start to finish. And it proves once and for all that there’s a hell of a lot more to Moody than the end of the world. 10/10.

Can I tempt you if you haven’t yet read the book? Do you need more convincing? If so, check out the widget below. A large chunk of the novel has been added to WATTPAD, along with a number of other bits and bobs, including the whole of TRUST available for free.

Invasion of the Body Snatchers

IotBSRegular readers will know that I’m usually one of the first to moan about the film industry’s habit of remaking old movies. I stand by most of my previous comments, in that remakes are often a lame excuse to capitalise on the goodwill an older version of a movie has garnered (case in point, pretty much every remake of 1970’s and 1980’s horror – Nightmare on Elm Street, Friday the 13th, The Hills Have Eyes, Texas Chainsaw, and so on). Occasionally the original film-makers will be involved, and a remake will make sense (such as the 2013 Evil Dead… you could also argue that Evil Dead II was a remake of sorts of the 1981 original). There remains another category of remakes, and it just so happens that three of these updated versions of classic films rank in my top ten horror movies of all time. This is where new film-makers put a present day spin on horror tales which, quite often, were well made but were limited in some way – perhaps by the technology of the day, or maybe the social landscape has changed to give a story increased relevance. Two of three films I’m referring to here are David Cronenberg’s stunning The Fly, and John Carpenter’s ground-breaking The Thing.

Today’s movie recommendation, however, is a 1979 remake of a 1956 original which, although perhaps not quite scaling the heights of the Cronenberg and Carpenter movies I’ve just mentioned, is still an excellent example of a remake done right. I’m talking about Philip Kaufman’s 1978 INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS.

Continue reading

Up to my neck in Hate

Just checking in with a quick follow up to my recent update post and to explain the ongoing radio silence here right now. I’ve found myself buried neck deep in the HATER world once again, and man, I’m enjoying it. HATER was only ever Danny McCoyne’s story for me, but the more I’ve started to poke around that dark, brutal and relentlessly violent world again, the more the creative juices have started to flow. As soon as I can tell you what I’m dying to tell you, I will. Until then, here’s another piece of stunning artwork which Tomislav Tikulin produced to promote the release of the original novels. This one is a scene from the climax of DOG BLOOD which, incredibly, is five years old next month. Time flies. If you’re new to HATER, visit www.thehatertrilogy.com to find out more.

Dog Blood TT

Guest blog – GAY, NAZI, CROSS DRESSING ZOMBIES! (or HOW TO SUBVERT THE GENRE AND GET AWAY WITH IT) by Jasper Bark

Jasper Bark once ate my brains (don’t believe me? Here’s irrefutable proof). So it’s with pleasure, and not a little apprehension, that I welcome him to this site with a guest post. Take it away, Jasper…

7645611Over a decade ago, while I was a film journalist, I got to interview producer Jeffrey Katzenberg as part of the the press junket for Shrek 2. At one point I asked him if he thought the Shrek franchise was subverting the fairytale/family entertainment genre, so beloved of Disney? Katzenberg rolled his eyes and shook his head at my question.

“Y’know,” he said. “I get about ten young writers coming into my office every week telling me they’ve got a script that reinvents some genre or other. But you know what – I wish they’d just learn to write the freaking genre, before trying to remake it!” I remember being a bit abashed at the time, not just because he’d brushed off my question, but I probably had some work tucked away in a drawer that aspired to reinvent a genre or two. With hindsight however, I can’t help thinking how spot on his comment was.

Every genre has to reinvent itself over time if it’s to remain relevant and fresh to successive generations. However, so many attempts end up falling flat, or missing the mark. So, what I’d like to look at in this guest post, is the ways in which writers, directors and other genre practitioners have successfully subverted the horror genre throughout its long history, to get an idea of what really works.

Continue reading

1984

1984A week or so ago I attended a school production of 1984. With a small cast, limited props and basic lighting and sound, they did an excellent job of bringing George Orwell’s classic novel to life. As I was watching, it struck me how relevant and frightening the story remains today (in fact, just about the only thing that’s dated about it is the title) and I immediately dug out and re-watched the most recent film version starring John Hurt and the late Richard Burton. This bleak and powerful film is my movie recommendation for this week.

1984 is a remarkable novel which has, of course, had an enormous cultural impact since its publication in 1949. I could write reams about the continued (increasing?) relevance of Orwell’s nightmare vision, but this is neither the place nor the time. Instead, the purpose of this post is simply to draw your attention to a beautifully made adaptation of an extraordinarily important book. Here’s a trailer. Click the link below for my thoughts.

Continue reading