Time to Talk

I’ve been intending to write this piece for a while, but I didn’t know how to start or when to post it. Today’s the day. Today, if you didn’t know, is Time to Talk day and like thousands of other people, I’m taking five minutes to talk about my experiences with the aim of breaking the silence (and stigma) around mental health. Please don’t switch off. Please read through to the end.

You see, last May, my world fell apart. My personal life, my relationships, my health, my career – everything crumbled and collapsed. None of it made sense anymore, and I couldn’t see a way to start repairing the damage. Hell, I didn’t even know if I wanted to fix things.

That might sound overdramatic, but that’s exactly how it felt. One day everything was fine, the next… Well it still makes me go cold thinking about those days. I’ve spent hours, days, weeks and months since then trying to put everything back together and make sense of what happened, and if there hadn’t been such a stigma about mental health, I think that perhaps my meltdown could have been avoided or at least lessened.

Banging your head

I’d always been the big man. I’d done pretty well in everything I tried to do. I don’t mean to sound arrogant, it’s just the way I am. I work hard. Sometimes too hard. Five years ago I felt invincible with a great family, good health, a lovely home and a career that felt like it was skyrocketing. A couple of years back, though, something changed. We moved house, and I fulfilled my writing obligations. Then, all of a sudden, nothing. Bigger bills, no book deals. I felt increasingly disconnected from everything and everyone, and became increasingly reclusive. My mood changed. I was banging my head against a brick wall. The words didn’t stop coming, but the flood of books I was producing reduced to a slow trickle. I stopped being excited by writing, and it began to feel like a chore. Stories remained uncompleted. Ideas were shelved. I spent more time thinking about what I should have been doing, than actually doing any of it.

I’ll cut a long story short: I was pretty seriously depressed, and I had no idea at all. Or maybe I did know, I just didn’t want to accept it…

Last summer everything came to a head. And contrary to how it felt at the time, being diagnosed with depression wasn’t the end of my world; instead it was a chance to press reset, to get myself back on track, and to learn to love myself and my world again.

Forgive me if that sounds a little saccharine and cliched, because it happens to be true. Thanks to an incredible family, a great GP, and a bunch of other wonderful folk, things are moving in the right direction. I’ve gone back to non-writing work to make sure I mix with other people, and I’m loving the buzz of spending time with folks again. I was worried it might have meant the end of my writing, but I don’t think that’s the case. I’ve written the first draft of a new novel since 1 January. There’s progress on a number of long-gestating projects. Infected Books is growing exponentially. I’m more excited by writing than ever.

As I said at the beginning, it’s Time to Talk day today (find out more about it here and here), and the aim of the day is to reduce some of the stigma around mental health. Lots of people suffer, and a large number continue to suffer in silence. I think I’d known for a long time what was wrong, I just didn’t want to admit it. Bloody hell, I wish I’d been more honest with myself. It would have saved me (and the people I love the most) a heck of a lot of pain and heartache.

I’m a writer, and this site is supposed to be about my books and films, so I’ll finish this piece by bringing it back to the business of writing. Regular visitors here will remember my series of writing articles ‘What Works for Me.’ You might have noticed they dried up around the same time I imploded last spring. It’s been incredibly interesting to look back at the books I’ve written over the last two years or so in light of what I’ve discovered about myself, because if I wasn’t outwardly honest with myself about my health, I definitely had some inkling of what was going on as I’d been writing about my problems all along. I only have to look at the male characters I’d created… there’s Steven Johnson from STRAIGHT TO YOU – a man who is on the verge of losing absolutely everything because he can’t bring himself to face his own demons. There’s Stuart from THE COST OF LIVING – a belligerent, stubborn bugger who’s set on his course and who won’t listen to anyone else, even when they’re clearly right and he’s so very obviously wrong. And then, finally, there’s Scott Griffiths from STRANGERS. I’ve had a huge reaction to Scott, not least because he’s an absolute shit: a total, wretched scumbag who outwardly appears to be dedicated to his family, but who has a seriously warped view of right and wrong and no appreciation of how his behaviour affects those around him. I was terrified and stunned when I read the book back just prior to publication and realised I’d been writing about aspects of myself.

Things are good today. Thanks for sticking with me. There’s some really exciting stuff on the horizon.

If anything I’ve written about affects you or someone you know, please find Time to Talk today.

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  • Clare Allington

    Brilliant piece; and you’re so right Stuart was unlike any character you’ve ever written!
    But boy was he awful!

  • Grant Van Funkle

    Glad things are on track again David. And yr right.. Scott really was a shit!

  • Time to Change

    Thanks for sharing, David. Take care, C at Time to Change

  • Heather Delvaux

    Hell, you’re not alone! Lifes a bitch but you gotta keep going..what other choice do we have? Thanks for writing this.

  • Vicky Saunders

    Don’t ever be embarrassed to say you’ve struggled. It took me a long time to come to terms with admitting something was wrong. I believe it makes you a stronger person. Thank you David for writing this personal piece. Best of luck for you and your family.

  • Paul McDonald

    I’ve never commented on any of your posts. I’m merely normally a bystander looking in, but, after reading that I feel compelled to leave a message.
    I congratulate you on both your sincerely and honesty.
    I suffered the same thing myself about 12 years ago, and it literally made tore my world apart. I lost many people close to me. At least you realised what was happening to you in time.
    Keep on your present track and I (as always) await your next work.

  • Greg at 2 Book Lovers Reviews

    Well said! It takes a lot of character to open up like that.

  • John Adams

    David. Great article. Congradulations to you doingbetter!! Ito havesuffered from depression and i totally agree!! Youreone ofthe absolute TOP writers outtheretoday!! Period

  • Lisa Harrold

    …..and things will be better tomorrow also. Thankyou for sharing this immensely personal life experience. You are an amazing author, your books are among some of my absolute favourites. I wish you all the very best for whatever your lifes journey may be. If you keep writing, I’ll keep reading!!!

  • CraigSaunders

    Good post, David.

  • Amy Hutchinson

    To this date , when I am in the library I tell people about “The Hater Series” Don’t give up EVER we need you Mr. David Moody !!!

  • Sal Coltzau

    Thank you for writing this David. Having had a nervous breakdown myself last year, my love and passion for being a librarian has unfortunately been lost, but the cliche of one door closes another opens, I’m looking to study at uni, so that I can assist others who have faced the same demons as me. Take care, and again thank you for sharing, it was very brave of you.

  • Thanks CraigSaunders Hope all’s good with you.

  • CraigSaunders

    All good here – still ticking :)

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