Global round up

A few quick updates for a Friday afternoon…

mX, a free Australian newspaper, ran a feature on HATER this week. Click here to download a copy.

An interview I did with www.scyla.com in Spain is now online (in English and Spanish!) here. (An update to this update… another Spanish interview with www.fantasymundo.com is now online here in English and Spanish.)

And finally, Herbst: Läuterung (the German language version of Autumn: Purification) is attracting some great reviews like this one from www.roterdorn.de.

Have a great weekend (an extra long one if you’re in the UK!). Maybe I’ll bump into some of you at Sci-Fi-London on Sunday.

(By the way, the ‘The Men They Couldn’t Hang’ competition is now closed. Winners will be announced next week.)

Sci-Fi London

I’ll be appearing at Sci-Fi London this Sunday May 3rd, taking part in a panel discussion: ‘Where’s My Jetpack?’

“Science fiction has promised us interstellar travel, flying cars, hoverboards, teleportation, universal translators, colonies in space and so much more. So where is it? In a world where London’s transport infrastructure can be brought to a standstill by 6 inches of snow and end-of-the-world scenarios play out in fiction, films and TV, is the mobile phone and the Internet really the best we can do?”

I’ve got two tickets to the panel to give away, courtesy of the event organisers. They’ll go to the first two people to email me at davidmoody@djmoody.co.uk with the subject line ‘Sci-Fi London’. These are tickets to the above mentioned panel only, not the whole festival, and you’ll need to get yourself to and from the venue and cover your own expenses etc. etc. etc.

Please take a moment to visit www.sci-fi-london.com and look at the full programme for the weekend. Until Friday 1st May you can get 2-for-1 on tickets for any of the literary panels if you book by phone (020 7451 9944) and say the words AUTHOR BLOG!

If anyone is going to the festival on Sunday, please let me know in advance and, if it fits in with everyone’s plans, we’ll try and meet up and say hello!

The Autumn movie

The team at Renegade want you to see the Autumn movie, and so do I. I know they’re as frustrated as anyone that the film’s not yet been released, and they’re working hard behind the scenes to get it onto cinema and TV screens.

Over at the movie’s official blog, they’re asking for your input. If you’re in the UK or Canada, please head over to their site at autumnthemovie.blogspot.com and answer their questions. Alternatively, you can email your views to: autumninfo (at) renegademotionpictures.com.

Thanks in advance for your patience and input.

When half the people want to kill the rest

I love that sentence! It’s a Google translation of the headline from a nice article about HATER / ODIO in today’s edition of the Spanish newspaper Público. Here’s a link to the online version of the story:

http://www.publico.es/culturas/221661/mitad/gente/quiere/matar/resto

…and you can download a pdf of the paper from this link here.

Gatecrasher

Last night Steven Rumbelow (director of the Autumn movie) and Dickon Tolson (who plays Carl) appeared on Steve Genier’s Nocturnal Frequency radio show. Amongst other things they talked about working on the movie, working with David Carradine and the daily dedication of Autumn’s method-acting zombie extras! Unfortunately there was no specific news about release dates, but it’s definitely worth a listen.

Oh, and I gatecrashed half way through!

You can listen to the show (or download it) here.

Australia and New Zealand

HATER is now available in Australia and New Zealand. The Canberra Times had this to say:

Hater has had an unusual publishing history, being self-published by Moody in 2006, but now picked up by Gollancz. A movie version is in pre-production by Guillermo del Toro of Pan’s Labyrinth fame. Hater is a fast-paced novel written in a staccato style that highlights the growing horror of a  British society  falling apart. The main character, Danny McCoyne, stuck in a dead end office job and suffocating commuting lifestyle, observes one of an increasing number of  violent attacks in the street. Moody fills out this scenario through dark vignettes of violence by ‘haters’ who attack  people without warning and without provocation. Moody conjures up an increasing atmosphere of suspense and paranoia with society disintegrating into warring factions with McCoyne initially straddling the two.

The cause of the increasing epidemic of violence is largely unexplained. A ‘hater’ reflects ” There is a fundamental genetic difference between us and them… which, until now, has remained dormant… its now us and them’. Unlike the novels by Lindqvist and Ryan , Moody says “what I’ve actually done is to write a zombie story from the perspective of the zombies”. Moody’s twist is the ‘haters’ “don’t lose their intelligence or feelings, rather they are convinced that everyone else are the bad guys”.

Moody extrapolates from current British fears about immigration, street violence and terrorism to highlight that  fear is used in society to justify pre-emptive strikes. As one character says, “we know who poses a threat to us and who is on our side”. Hater’s relentless pace, tension and graphic images will lend itself admirably to its film adaptation.