Search Results for: AUTUMN

AUTUMN: THE HUMAN CONDITION

Autumn: The Human Condition (Infected Books, 2013)AUTUMN: THE HUMAN CONDITION

The human race is finished. Mankind is all but dead and only a handful of frightened individuals remain. These people have survived through chance, not skill, and they are a desperate bunch: cheating lovers, workshy civil servants, permanently drunk publicans, teenage rebels, obsessive accountants, failed husbands, first-time cross-dressers, disrobed priests and more… Experience the end of the world as seen from almost fifty different perspectives.

Part-companion, part-guidebook and part-sequel, AUTUMN: THE HUMAN CONDITION follows the individual stories of these desperate survivors through their final dark days.

For more information about the AUTUMN series, visit www.lastoftheliving.net

“Takes the genre in a fascinating new direction. If John Wyndham was alive and writing zombie novels, they’d read like this” —Jonathan Maberry

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AUTUMN: AFTERMATH

Autumn: Aftermath (Thomas Dunne Books, 2012)AUTUMN: AFTERMATH

A band of refugees has taken shelter in a medieval castle – a fortress that has stood strong for hundreds of years. They are the last of the living. Besieged by the dead, they only emerge when it’s absolutely necessary. As autumn turns to winter, however, the balance of power slowly begins to shift.

The unexpected appearance of survivors from another group changes everything. They bring choice, and an alternative way of life which is a far cry from the world everyone has been forced to leave behind. Society as we know it has crumbled beyond repair and things will never be the same again. Some people are ready to embrace this change, others can’t let go of the past. The choice is divisive.Are we entering mankind’s final days? In the aftermath of the disease, will the last survivors destroy each other, or will the dead destroy them all?

For more information about the AUTUMN series, visit www.lastoftheliving.net

“As demonstrated throughout his previous novels, readers should crown Moody king of the zombie horror novel, and his final book in the Autumn series adds a much-deserved jewel to his crown.” —Booklist

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AUTUMN: DISINTEGRATION

Autumn: Disintegration (Thomas Dunne Books, 2011)AUTUMN: DISINTEGRATION

Forty days have passed since the world died. Billions of corpses walk the Earth. Everything is disintegrating…

A group of eleven men and women have survived against the odds. On an almost daily basis, they attack the dead with brutal ferocity, tearing through them with utter contempt.

Somewhere nearby, out of sight and out of earshot, is another group that has adopted a completely different survival strategy. Where the others have used brutality and strength, these people have demonstrated subtlety, planning, and tactics.

A series of horrific events force the two groups together. Backed into a corner and surrounded by hundreds of thousands of corpses, they all know that their final battle with the dead is about to begin.

For more information about the AUTUMN series, visit www.lastoftheliving.net

“Moody has succeeded in not just driving forward the thread of the series but expanding his Autumn universe in admirable fashion.” —Andy Erupts

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AUTUMN: PURIFICATION

Autumn: Purification (Thomas Dunne Books, 2011)AUTUMN: PURIFICATION

A small group of survivors is imprisoned in an underground base, trapped between the door to the outside world and the sealed entrance to the airtight cocoon where hundreds of soldiers sit and wait for rescue.

On the surface the crowd of bodies is growing in size every day, drawn there by the heat and the noise of the people hiding underground beneath their rotting feet. The sheer mass of decaying flesh above begins to cause problems for the military when vents become blocked, but a mission to clear the dead starts a vicious battle between the living and the dead. And there are far more of the dead…

For more information about the AUTUMN series, visit www.lastoftheliving.net

“Not for the gore-hounds who can’t think past a pile of entrails, but the rest of the readers in the world (including the legion of zombie fans with working brains), this is a perfect next chapter in the wonderful AUTUMN series. Landmark.” —Jonathan Maberry

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AUTUMN: THE CITY

Autumn: The City (Thomas Dunne Books, 2011)AUTUMN: THE CITY

A disease of unimaginable ferocity has torn across the face of the planet leaving billions dead. A small group of survivors shelter in the remains of a devastated city, hiding in terror as the full effects of the horrific infection start to become clear.

The sudden appearance of a company of soldiers again threatens the survivors’ fragile existence. Do they bring with them hope, help and answers, or more pain, fear and suffering?

For more information about the AUTUMN series, visit www.lastoftheliving.net

“Moody is a master of the human condition… a must read for any post-apocalyptic fan.” —2 Book Lovers Reviews

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AUTUMN

Autumn (Thomas Dunne Books, 2010)AUTUMN

A bastard hybrid of War of the Worlds and Night of the Living DeadAutumn chronicles the struggle of a small group of survivors forced to contend with a world torn apart by a deadly disease. After 99% of the population of the planet is killed in less than 24 hours, for the very few who have managed to stay alive, things are about to get much worse. Animated by “phase two” of some unknown contagion, the dead begin to rise. At first slow, blind, dumb and lumbering, quickly the bodies regain their most basic senses and abilities… sight, hearing, locomotion… As well as the instinct toward aggression and violence. Held back only by the restraints of their rapidly decomposing flesh, the dead seem to have only one single goal – to lumber forth and destroy the sole remaining attraction in the silent, lifeless world: those who have survived the plague, who now find themselves outnumbered 1,000,000 to 1…

For more information about the AUTUMN series, visit www.lastoftheliving.net

“The best survival horror since Richard Matheson’s I am Legend” —Wayne Simmons, author of FLU and PLASTIC JESUS

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Looking back at the AUTUMN movie

So, as I’ve mentioned a couple of times in the last few weeks, I’ve been thinking about the AUTUMN series a lot recently. AUTUMN was the first of my books which really took off. As you may recall, I gave it away free online between 2001 and 2008 (when, strange as it now seems, eBooks were rare and very few people were giving them away), and it was downloaded many hundreds of thousands of times. I wrote a series of sequels which were well received, and the first book was even adapted as an online full cast audio drama which you can still listen to.

But then HATER came along and my focus shifted. I then moved onto other books and projects, and it’s now a sobering five years since the last book – AUTUMN: THE HUMAN CONDITION – was released. Yet even now people still get in touch regularly to tell me how much they’ve enjoyed the series.

When I wrote the very first draft of the very first book, way back in 1997, no one was writing about zombies. Very few people were watching zombie movies, either. In fact, no one was paying zombies any attention in any way, shape or form. But in the years which followed, a totally unexpected thing happened and, for the first time, the living dead became mainstream. In films, Danny Boyle’s 28 DAYS LATER was a huge hit (which sparked endless pointless debate about whether zombies should run or not, and whether or not his infected were zombies at all), and Zack Synder’s remake of George Romero’s ground-breaking DAWN OF THE DEAD bucked the trend and proved that not all remakes were worthless cash-ins. THE WALKING DEAD comic was launched and a number of writers including myself, BRIAN KEENE and DAVID WELLINGTON precipitated the flood of zombie fiction.

And despite hearing rumours to the contrary every few months since then, the bubble hasn’t burst. People still love the living dead.

I’m going to write two more AUTUMN novels. There – I’ve said it out loud and in public now. I have an idea which I can’t stop thinking about and that, for me, is the acid test. If an idea for a book won’t go away, then that book needs writing. I have a couple of other projects to wrap up first, then I’ll dive straight into what I’m currently calling AUTUMN: DAWN. I don’t want to say too much at the moment, but I think the time’s right for these new books. As I’ve already said, the world has changed dramatically since I first wrote AUTUMN. To my mind, zombies have always been the ultimate story-telling device for allowing writers and film-makers to study the human condition. By turning people into something so similar yet inherently different, it enables us to look back and consider what makes us human in the first place. Socially we’re in a vastly different place now to where we were in 2001, and I think it’ll be fascinating to imagine how we’d react to the events of AUTUMN if they took place today. The new books won’t replace the original novels, nor will they undermine them. Same dead world, different people. Not a rehash or reboot. It’s funny… one of the rules of zombie fiction and movies when I first started writing was that the characters had to have an unspoken innocence and couldn’t know what a zombie was. Given the pop culture explosion I’ve just been talking about, there’s no way I could get away with that in the new AUTUMN books!

So what about the movie?

It was released in 2008 to a torrent of abuse and ill-feeling. It creaks and it groans. It was made on a shoestring budget and it shows. People either loved it or hated it (mostly they hated it). I stopped trying to defend it and used the backlash to try and promote the books, working on the dubious premise that there’s no such thing as bad publicity. Tellingly, none of the publishers of the series around the world mentioned the film in their marketing, though an editor who worked on the books did once tell me that ‘it’s always better to have a bad film made of one of your books than no film at all’. And with hindsight, I think I agree. But how bad a film is it? Was all the negativity justified? This week I took a deep breath and watched AUTUMN from start to finish for the first time in a decade. And you know what? I really enjoyed it. I’m under no illusions, it’s not a great movie by any stretch of the imagination, but I don’t think it’s the absolute car crash that most people assume.

Here’s a trailer, and my thoughts follow. And yes, that is me on the DVD cover above.

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Steven Rumbelow – the director of AUTUMN – has passed away

I’ve sad news to report. Steven Rumbelow, who directed the 2009 movie adaptation of AUTUMN, has passed away. You can read Variety’s obituary here.

rp_51mrBhRXn3L._SS500_.jpgIf you’ve heard me talk about the AUTUMN movie, you might be surprised to hear this, but I think I’ve a lot to thank Steven for. I’ve been pretty vocal in the past about my feelings for the film – it was a valiant attempt to adapt the film for the screen, but it fell well short of its potential. The main cast was great (in particular Dexter Fletcher, Dickon Tolson and David Carradine) and some scenes really caught the look and feel of the novel beautifully. Technical shortcomings hampered production, and ultimately the level of the budget didn’t allow the film-makers to fully realise their ambition.

Some people loved the film, though. The UK’s well respected Empire Magazine called AUTUMN “surprisingly downbeat and intelligent“. 365Horror.co.uk said “It’s slow and thoughtful and mesmerising to watch, allowing the viewer to think and reflect. Rumbelow has created something worthy of the Romero tip of the hat here.Reviewer Nicholas Bergquist wroteIf you’re a bit tired of the same-old same-old zombie films, you need to see Autumn. If you’re just keen for a good horror movie that eschews standard formulae and obligatory kill counts, you need to see Autumn. If you want to watch a really damned fine end of the world tale that tries for a more measured pace… Autumn’s your movie.

But it’s fair to say, the criticism massively outweighed the praise. Also, the project never really stood a chance after David Carradine’s death and the subsequent leaking of an unfinished cut of the movie online which was seen (and slated) by hundreds of thousands of people.

I said I’ve a lot to thank Steven for, and I meant that. Watching the production of AUTUMN progress, both from a distance and when I was on set, and seeing how the film fared after release taught me a huge amount about the highs and lows of the movie business. I got to go to Canada and play zombie. I ended up on the DVD cover (yes, that’s me). I got to meet a number of very cool people along the way and was able to attend a number of film festivals and other events. Most importantly, in one way or another the movie had a huge effect on my demographic and made substantial numbers of people aware of my books who might not have heard of me otherwise. Someone once said to me it’s better to have a bad movie made of your book than no movie at all, and I’m inclined to agree. I think AUTUMN is a seriously flawed movie more than an out and out bad film, but I’m pleased it happened. I’ll never forget the thrill of sitting in the first UK cinema showing and seeing the words ‘based on the novel by David Moody’ appear on screen.

Visiting the set of AUTUMN in December 2007

Visiting the set of AUTUMN in December 2007 (pictured with Steven Rumbelow)

My sincere condolences go out to Rachel, Dickon, and the rest of the Rumbelow and Renegade Motion Pictures families.

Autumn: Horror in the East III

I’m very pleased to confirm that I’ll be at the HORROR IN THE EAST convention in Lowestoft again this year. As you might remember, this event is particularly close to my heart, as it was born from the launch event for THEM OR US I held in Lowestoft back in 2011. As you might also remember, Lowestoft and the surrounding area is where the final chapters of Danny McCoyne’s story are played out…

The convention’s taking place on 8 November, and this year we’re in a great new venue (The Marina Theatre, alongside a horror film festival). Admission to the con is FREE. Plenty of authors will be in attendance, and there’ll be loads of great panels and events taking place throughout the day. Find out more on Facebook.HitE3