Search Results for: straight to you

Your last phone call home

Straight to You coverWe’re on the last leg of STRAIGHT TO YOU now. Steven’s nearing either a). his destination, b). the impending apocalypse, or c). both. Post-apocalyptic movies and fiction are often filled with big, spectacular show-stopping moments, but it’s often the quieter, more personal scenes which affect me most. I remember feeling desperately sad when I wrote the chapter of the novel which has been posted over at WATTPAD today.

You’re hundreds of miles away, with no hope of ever getting back to the people you love that you’ve left behind. Imagine the pain of your last phone call home.

Moody zombie goodness for your listening/ reading pleasure

Very pleased to announce that BOOKTRACK have released soundtracks to ISOLATION, THE COST OF LIVING and STRANGERS. If you’ve never listened to/read a booktrack before, you’re in for a treat. You get the entire ebook which is synchronised to a soundtrack of music and effects designed to enhance the reading experience. And believe me, it really does.

Booktrack Banner

To celebrate the launch of these three titles, I’ve written a guest blog over at the Booktrack site in which I talk about how music affects my writing. And I’ve even shared the writing playlist I use which has grown organically over many years. I hope you enjoy the booktracks. Please let me know what you think.

 

TOO YOUNG TO BE OLD – final parts available to read now

5WV_1SHT_TSR_05.inddJust a very quick post to let you know that the final two parts of my 5TH WAVE story – TOO YOUNG TO BE OLD – are now available to read at Wattpad. If you remember from my last post, I was approached by Wattpad and Sony Pictures to write a UK-based story as part of the publicity campaign for the forthcoming 5TH WAVE movie, and this is the result. I hope you enjoy it.

The 5TH WAVE movie hits the screen worldwide in January 2016.

Did you get to meet the STRANGERS?

My most recent novel, STRANGERS, came out at the end of 2014, and with everything that’s been going on since then, I’ve been guilty of not shouting about it enough. The book got some great press and I’m very proud of it. This is Horror were kind enough to say “Strangers is easily Moody’s best work to date, a dark, disturbing and visceral book that gives him a legitimate claim to the title of Britain’s Best Living Horror Author that was left vacant by James Herbert’s untimely death.DLS reviews said “I can’t stress enough how utterly captivating Strangers is. It’s addictive reading from start to finish. And it proves once and for all that there’s a hell of a lot more to Moody than the end of the world. 10/10.

Can I tempt you if you haven’t yet read the book? Do you need more convincing? If so, check out the widget below. A large chunk of the novel has been added to WATTPAD, along with a number of other bits and bobs, including the whole of TRUST available for free.

Guest post: It’s Behind You! Jonathan Wood talks ALIEN and the legacy of HR Giger

This week I’m pleased to present a very timely guest post from another of Moody’s Survivors, Jonathan Wood, who talks about one of his (and my) favourite films – Ridley Scott’s seminal 1979 classic, ALIEN. I’m sure there are very few people who’ve yet to see the film, but if you’re one of them, please be warned: spoilers ahead.

alien_movie_posterThe death of H R Giger earlier this month saddened me. A true genius and visionary, his name became synonymous with biomechanics – fusion of the human body and machinery. A futuristic surrealist, it wasn’t until around 1979 that Giger came to the world’s attention for his work on ALIEN. Director Ridley Scott took the theme of a haunted house in space and created a masterpiece of modern horror/sci-fi, thanks in no small part to Giger’s unforgettable biomechanoid xenomorph.

ALIEN was a movie that terrified me as a teenager. And when I say terrified, I really do mean it. After watching the film I think I slept with the light on for about three or four days after, such was the profound effect it had on me. ALIEN has also influenced my own work with it’s principal themes of claustrophobia, surprise, and the steady build up of terror in a story which is all the more terrifying for what we don’t see.

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The Apocalypse Read: Five novels about the end of the world that you probably haven’t read, but really should

I’m pleased to present another guest post from a member of Moody’s Survivors. Today it’s the turn of Nat Robinson

end-of-the-worldDo away with The Stand: we’ve all read it (hopefully) and seen the TV movie. I am Legend as well – you’re not welcome here. Anything with zombies spelling the end of mankind? Please leave the building in an orderly fashion, kindly taking any severed limbs with you.

It’s all the Mayan’s fault. They ran out of days on their calendar and created a concern that touched almost every man, woman and child on the planet in the process. The big day came and went with about so much as a plane falling from the sky: an incorrect belief that circled the globe because an ancient mathematician was too lazy to count any further than he had too. Every soothsayer and psychic since we’ve been able to put quill to papyrus has had the fantasy of getting it right and guessing humanity’s ultimate demise, as if correctly guessing our extinction would earn them bonus points in the afterlife or perhaps to be smug for that last second before we’re all wiped out would make it all worthwhile.

Death is our last fetish and is as inevitable as taxes, as the adage goes. It greets us on the news, in soap operas and in our own little lives with our own sequence of tragedies that pepper our existence. There are many books that speculate on our end. Nostradamus had a good go. The Bible dwells on fire, brimstone and punishing sinners with the arrival of the Four Horsemen and the ultimate torture room, Hades. The recent surge in post-apocalyptic fiction, with the rise of The Walking Dead series for example has further cemented the end of days into popular culture.  The end sells.

Many writers have explored this, some more popular than others. So I’d like to introduce you to five powerful novels which treat the end of us just as brutally as Stephen King preaches in The Stand, Richard Matheson explores in I am Legend and John Wyndham shows the dangers of meddling with nature in The Day of the Triffids.

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Hitting your head against a brick wall

In today’s What Works For Me post I wanted to clarify a point I made in the very first of these articles back in January. I was talking about planning, if you remember, and the process I follow to turn an initial spark of an idea into a finished piece of writing. I was talking specifically about the ground rules I set myself to get my first novel finished back in 1994, and the fourth of those rules was don’t force it: if you’re not in the right mood to write, walk away and come back later.

A few folks took exception to this, and I can see why. I don’t think I explained myself properly, and some clarification is in order.

Banging your head

Writing is hard. Bloody hard. There are days when the words flow, and there are days when they definitely don’t, when you feel like you’re banging your head against a brick wall. You know what it’s like when you’re reading and you realise you’ve been looking at the same paragraph for the last fifteen minutes, maybe even the same sentence… I get that when I’m writing too. I occasionally reach a point in the day when I just can’t write another word, when I’ve stopped being productive. It can be a physical thing, not a mental thing.

THIS IS NOT THE SAME AS HITTING A PROBLEM WITH A STORY.

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AUTUMN: AFTERMATH – can I have five minutes of your time?

Autumn-Aftermath-9780575091498We’re another step closer to making the AUTUMN: AFTERMATH hardcover from Infected Books (in association with Gollancz) a reality. I now need to get an idea how many people actually want to buy the book in order that I can get to work on the number-crunching. Could you please spare five minutes to visit this page and complete a very brief survey? There’s no obligation, and no personal details are required.

Thanks in advance. In the meantime, if this is the first you’ve heard of this project, here’s a link to a post which explains more…

If you could let me have your responses by 10 September, I’d be very grateful!

And finally, as I mentioned previously, if you’ve bought one of the limited edition hardcovers of AUTUMN: THE HUMAN CONDITION, you’ll be entitled to a discount on AFTERMATH. If you haven’t yet picked up THE HUMAN CONDITION, it’s currently on offer at the relaunched Infected Bookstore.

Your second helping of paranoia for the week – chapter 23 of TRUST

Things are starting to get really weird in Thatcham in today’s new chapter – read it now at www.trustdavidmoody.com.

And it’s almost your last chance to win a limited edition hardcover of the book – the TRUST giveaway ends this coming Monday. Click here to remind yourself of the details and to grab a few more entries before the competition closes.

Illustration by Craig Paton (www.craigpaton.com).