RIP George Romero

I’ve just heard the terrible news that the Godfather of zombies, George A Romero, has passed away at the age of 77 after a short battle with lung cancer. This is awful, awful news. I’m hard pushed to think of a filmmaker who had such an influence on the horror genre. For me, I can trace my fascination with zombies to a particular dark and storm-filled afternoon when, with my brother and a bunch of friends, we sat down to watch the original NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD on laserdisc (yes, it was that long ago). That movie was revelatory, as was DAWN OF THE DEAD, and then DAY OF THE DEAD. Landmark. Without Mr Romero’s movies, myself and scores of other writers and filmmakers would have had to find something else to do for a living. His films – particularly the original DEAD trilogy and other classics like THE CRAZIES and MARTIN – struck a chord in a way very few movies did. The series which kickstarted my career – AUTUMN – would never have been written had it not been for Romero’s films.

George Romero is survived by his wife and three children. My sincere condolences go out to them at this very sad time.

SCREAM issue 32

321-212x300I owe my friends at SCREAM MAGAZINE an apology. I’ve been meaning to post for a while to let you know that issue 32 is out, but various things have conspired to get in the way and I’ve not had chance to put anything together until now.

As usual, this month’s issue is filled with great articles including a feature on the classic Hammer horror films THE VAMPIRE LOVERS, LUST FOR A VAMPIRE and TWINS OF EVIL – known collectively as The Karnstein Trilogy. There’s something timeless and unique about Hammer movies. This box set is one of my prized horror possessions, and I’d recommend it without hesitation to anyone with even a passing interest in the horror genre. Required viewing.

Back to the mag and, as always, the team behind SCREAM have proved their horror credentials. Where else could you find an interview with Mike Christopher aka Hare Krishna zombie in George Romero‘s 1978 original DAWN OF THE DEAD.

From the earlier days of the zombie sub-genre to the bang up to date. SCREAM 32 includes a piece on FEAR THE WALKING DEAD which features interviews with Robert Kirkman and others. I recently watched the first episode of FEAR and was completely underwhelmed. if you’ve been watching, answer me this: should I stick with it?

To get hold of SCREAM, visit www.screamhorrormag.com. You can also pick up the magazine from any branch of HMV, Forbidden Planet, or any of the newsagents listed here. SCREAM is also available digitally as iSCREAM!

Night of the Living Dead (1990)

NIGHT-OF-THE-LIVING-DEAD-1990-posterA couple of times recently I’ve talked about remakes of classic horror movies. Sometimes they work, and sometimes they don’t. I maintain that in order for a remake to be a critical success, it has to have a point. It might be that the original fell short in some way, or that film-making technology has advanced sufficiently to benefit the telling of a particular story. Or maybe a sociological, environmental or political change or similar has given the premise a new lease of life.

Unfortunately, the George Romero scripted, Tom Savini directed 1990 remake of Romero’s classic NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD has very little reason to exist. I caught the remake on it’s opening weekend twenty-five years ago (twenty-five years… how did that happen?) and I took the opportunity to watch it again recently. I really enjoyed it when I was twenty, and I wondered how it would hold up today. The short answer – it didn’t. Not particularly well, anyway.

It’s a new night for terror – and a new dawn in horror movie-making when special-effects genius Tom Savini (creator of the spectacularly gruesome make-up in FRIDAY THE 13TH and CREEPSHOW) brings modern technology to this colourful remake of George A. Romero‘s 1968 cult classic. Seven strangers are trapped in an isolated farmhouse while cannibalistic zombies – awakened from death by the return of a radioactive space probe – wage a relentless attack, killing (and eating) everyone in their path. The classic for the 90s: graphic, gruesome and more terrifying than ever!

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