A collision of two great things

Great thing #1: my friend PETER MCKEIRNON, author of the DEATH IN A NORTHERN TOWN series is also the brains behind a cracking web-based zombie series, DEAD TOWN. You can watch the first episode below, and episode two is now online also.

Great thing #2: the folks behind one of my favourite magazines, STARBURST, are running a film festival in Manchester between the 26 and 28 August. STARBURST and I go back a long, long way.

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The collision of great things? DEAD TOWN, alongside a whole host of other movies, TV shows and exclusive premiers, will be shown at the STARBURST INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL. There’s some incredible stuff showing and many special guests. More info at www.starburstfilmfest.co.uk.

And here, for your viewing pleasure, is episode one of DEAD TOWN:

Peter will also be appearing alongside me at the Birmingham Horror Con in February 2017.

Guest post – Death in a Northern Town author Peter Mckeirnon talks about his influences

Today I’d like to introduce you to PETER MCKEIRNON – author of DEATH IN A NORTHERN TOWN and its recently released sequel. I got chatting to Peter a while back and was really interested in his take on the zombie apocalypse (which feels similarly low-fi to AUTUMN, but far funnier). In this guest post he talks about his influences.

death-in-a-northern-townI have never seriously thought about my influences. Usually I am asked who my favourite author is or what my favourite zombie movie is, but when Dave asked me to write a guest article about what inspires my writing I began to consider, for the first time, what my real influences are. The answers take me back to my childhood and the horror movies, comedy shows and ultimately the town in which I grew up.

I grew up on a council estate in Runcorn, Cheshire, UK. One of the great things about the area I lived was that once a week a man driving an old Ford Escort would pull up at the top of our road, open the boot and rent out the shittiest collection of pirated movies you had ever seen. But within this mishmash of badly copied 1980s straight to video movies were classic horrors such as Killer Clowns from Outer Space, Munchies (camp Critters rip off), The Evil Dead, The Fly… the list goes on. What was so brilliant was you could rent up to 15 movies a week for £5 and the nice illegal video rental man really didn’t care that a kid who should be at home watching The Never Ending Story was instead renting copies of The Stuff, Class of Nuke ‘Em High, Troll, Garbage Pail Kids The Movie (not really for children, adults or anyone for that matter!) and Vamp.

Watching horror from a young age changed me greatly and where other kids on my estate played football and argued over who was going to be Kenny Dalgleish, Ian Rush or Peter Beardsley, I was busy scaring the shit out of family members by hiding behind doors and appearing at windows dressed up as a vampire or a werewolf! This was where my love affair with horror began.

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