Birmingham Horror Con – this Saturday

Hope to see you at the BIRMINGHAM HORROR CONVENTION at Edgbaston Stadium this Saturday. I’ll be there along with a host of horror luminaries, including stars of the NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET, FRIDAY THE 13th and HALLOWEEN movies, and some excellent author chums like ADAM NEVILL, MATT SHAW, PETER MCKEIRNON, ADAM MILLARD and many others. It promises to be an absolute cracker of an event. Tickets are still available – click here for more information.

 

Voodoo Child by Wayne Simmons and Andre Duza – out now from Infected Books

It’s a retro-inspired pulp horror classic in the making! Available now. Grab a signed copy from Infected Books (click here) and get a complementary ebook version.

It's a retro-inspired #pulp #horror Classic in the making. #Voodoo Child by Wayne Simmons and Andre Duza. Out now from #infectedbooks

With back-cover blurbs from Steve Johnson (SFX genius who worked on Ghostbusters, Big Trouble in Little China, An American Werewolf in London) and Harry Manfredini (who wrote the iconic score for Friday 13th), this blood-soaked beauty of a book comes very highly recommended.

Voodoo Child is also available from Amazon and other online retailers.

Night of the Living Dead (1990)

NIGHT-OF-THE-LIVING-DEAD-1990-posterA couple of times recently I’ve talked about remakes of classic horror movies. Sometimes they work, and sometimes they don’t. I maintain that in order for a remake to be a critical success, it has to have a point. It might be that the original fell short in some way, or that film-making technology has advanced sufficiently to benefit the telling of a particular story. Or maybe a sociological, environmental or political change or similar has given the premise a new lease of life.

Unfortunately, the George Romero scripted, Tom Savini directed 1990 remake of Romero’s classic NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD has very little reason to exist. I caught the remake on it’s opening weekend twenty-five years ago (twenty-five years… how did that happen?) and I took the opportunity to watch it again recently. I really enjoyed it when I was twenty, and I wondered how it would hold up today. The short answer – it didn’t. Not particularly well, anyway.

It’s a new night for terror – and a new dawn in horror movie-making when special-effects genius Tom Savini (creator of the spectacularly gruesome make-up in FRIDAY THE 13TH and CREEPSHOW) brings modern technology to this colourful remake of George A. Romero‘s 1968 cult classic. Seven strangers are trapped in an isolated farmhouse while cannibalistic zombies – awakened from death by the return of a radioactive space probe – wage a relentless attack, killing (and eating) everyone in their path. The classic for the 90s: graphic, gruesome and more terrifying than ever!

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Invasion of the Body Snatchers

IotBSRegular readers will know that I’m usually one of the first to moan about the film industry’s habit of remaking old movies. I stand by most of my previous comments, in that remakes are often a lame excuse to capitalise on the goodwill an older version of a movie has garnered (case in point, pretty much every remake of 1970’s and 1980’s horror – Nightmare on Elm Street, Friday the 13th, The Hills Have Eyes, Texas Chainsaw, and so on). Occasionally the original film-makers will be involved, and a remake will make sense (such as the 2013 Evil Dead… you could also argue that Evil Dead II was a remake of sorts of the 1981 original). There remains another category of remakes, and it just so happens that three of these updated versions of classic films rank in my top ten horror movies of all time. This is where new film-makers put a present day spin on horror tales which, quite often, were well made but were limited in some way – perhaps by the technology of the day, or maybe the social landscape has changed to give a story increased relevance. Two of three films I’m referring to here are David Cronenberg’s stunning The Fly, and John Carpenter’s ground-breaking The Thing.

Today’s movie recommendation, however, is a 1979 remake of a 1956 original which, although perhaps not quite scaling the heights of the Cronenberg and Carpenter movies I’ve just mentioned, is still an excellent example of a remake done right. I’m talking about Philip Kaufman’s 1978 INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS.

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